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Unauthorisierte Biografie
über Paul McCartney

1988 erschien im New Yorker Doubleday Verlag die unauthorisierte Biografie über Paul McCartney von Chet Flippo: "Yesterday".

In Transit to/from Germany:
• The Beatles did not have enough money to get to Germany by train on their first visit there. They went by van with Alan Williams for £15 to be deducted from their pay. Williams also lent them money for clothes, toothbrushes. He stated that he was never paid back for this (Williams).

•Williams also claimed that the Beatles promised to pay £10 per head to travel to Germany (Williams).

•The Beatles were scheduled to play for seven weeks in Germany starting in April 62. Brian billed this as a European Tour and even paid for the band to fly to Germany (Brown, p. 75).

•In London, Paul and Pete had to call home to Liverpool to get money to get home after their deportation from Germany (Flippo, p. 116).

•To get ready for the big trip, Paul and Stu had nicked fifteen pounds in advance from Allan for extra clothing and toiletries and so on. (Allan made Stu and Paul sign an official IOU, of course) (Flippo, p. 81)


Recording in Germany:

•Beatles made a record in Germany with Rory Storm's singer. The Beatles were backup with Ringo on drums. The flipside was a sales pitch by a gentleman selling leather goods. Alan Williams paid 10 quid for the recording.


• The Beatles offered to pay if they could make their own recording at the above mentioned German studio. Alan Williams advised that they had to get back to their performance that evening. (Williams).

•Beatle signed a contract as backup group. They were paid session man fees of 200 marks, no royalties.

•The recording with Tony Sheridan of the Saints Go Marching In and My Bonnie reached #5 on the local hit parade and sold a reputed 100,000 copies (Lewisohn. Chronicle p. 33).

•The Beatles offered to pay if they could make their own recording at the above mentioned German studio. Alan Williams advised that they had to get back to their performance that evening. (Williams).

•Beatle signed a contract as backup group. They were paid session man fees of 200 marks, no royalties.

•The recording with Tony Sheridan of the Saints Go Marching In and My Bonnie reached #5 on the local hit parade and sold a reputed 100,000 copies (Lewisohn. Chronicle p. 33).

•The Beatles were to be paid a flat fee of three hundred DM (about 26 pounds) and would not be eligible to receive any royalties from the Tony Sheridan sessions (Flippo, p. 134).


German Performances:

•The Beatles were told, upon their arrival, that they would be playing at the Indra and not he Kaiserkeller as originally thought. Pete Best thought that playing the Indra "definitely took us down a peg or two" (Giuliano).


• Bruno Koschmider required them to play from 8:30-2:00 with 30 minute breaks. £150 per week for the two month contract

•When Brian first dealt with Peter Eckhorn in mid '62 he wanted 500dm per member per week. Eckhorn offered 450dm. There was no contract at the time. Eckhorn returned to Germany. Three weeks later Horst Fascher offered them 500dm for April 13-May 13 1962 (Coleman).

•The Beatles were asked to play backup on Tony Sheridan’s songs and were paid 25 pounds each (Brown, p. 65).

•At the Indra the terms were 17 August to 16 October, for 30DM (£2.50) per man per day. Payable every Thursday. A. Williams was to receive £10 agent's commission to be deposited in his account with Commerzbank in Hamburg (Lewisohn. Chronicle. p. 2).

•Star Club. Hamburg. Nov 1-14 '62. 600DM (£53.50) per man per week (Lewisohn. Chronicle. p. 83).

Miscellaneous in Germany:

•Many prostitutes were buying the groups instruments, food, and drinks at the time the Beatles were playing there (Williams).

•John: But the last time we really didn't want to go back, when Brian made us go back to fulfill the contract. If we'd had our way, we would have copped out on the engagement, because we didn't feel we'd owed them f*** all. I mean we made all those clubs into international clubs (McCabe/Schonfeld, p. 88. For the Record).

•The Beatles tried to leave the Kaiserkeller for the Top Ten Club for more money. The owner of the Kaiserkeller then tried to have them deported.

John: These gangsters would come in, like the local Mafia. They'd send up a case of champagne onstage, this imitation German champagne. And we had to drink it or they'd kill us (laughs) you know. They'd say, "Drink it and then do 'What I Say?'" (McCabe/Schonfeld, p. 86. For the Record).

•A German club owner threatened a paternity lawsuit for his daughter. David Jacobs advised a quick settlement (Norman, p. 179).

•It was a common occurrence for the customers at the German bars to send free drinks to the stage for the Beatles.

•The Beatles and Hurricanes bet that whoever was on stage when it collapsed would receive a crate of champagne and piggy-back rides down the street from the other band. The Hurricanes, laughing, picked their way out of the wreckage and raced over to Willy's to collect on their bet. They were guzzling champagne and heaping verbal abuse on Bruno...Bruno docked them all five pounds for willfully breaking the stage (Flippo, p. 107).

•One afternoon Pete was dancing with a girl during a practice session when the Kaiserkellar was closed to the public. Herr Stein, the bouncer, told him to stop dancing. He pushed Pete and the girl apart and slapped the girl. Pete decked Stein. Bruno docked Pete five pounds for assault and the other Beatles the same amount for 'baiting' Stein (Flippo, p. 114).

•On the Beatles last trip to Hamburg Horst Fascher reportedly gave Brian 1000 marks under the table to appear at his club. The money was later distributed to the Beatles after Brian took his 25% share (Brown, p. 110).

•Little Richard: We spent two months together in Hamburg. John, Paul, George, and Pete. They would stay in my room every night. So hadn't any money, so I paid for their food. I used to buy steaks for John (Giuliano. Lost Int. p. 363)

•The Beatles used to like to take items from one stand stands at German market and put them in another. One time they gave away everything for free from one of the stands. While some people were running off with the goods in the stall, other stall owners and waiter from a nearby cafe were trying to stop them. The Beatles avoided arrest by offering to pay for the goods. They didn't have the money, but the waiters pooled their money to raise fifty pounds. Then the waiters wanted their money back. The Beatles came up with a plan to mug one of the customers for the money. John and Pete tried unsuccessfully to rob a drunken sailor several evening later (Flippo, p. 108).

•Brown reports that as many as 18,000 people would pass through the doors of the Star Club in one evening (Brown, p. 76).

•As an advance against their forthcoming weekly wages, Peter Eckhorn paid 158DM to the authorities on behalf of Pete and Paul-the cost of sending them home the previous winter-and with George now turned 18-year-old the way was finally clear for the group to return. This was for the Beatles return to the Top Ten Club in late 1960 (Lewisohn. Chronicle p. 31).

•In late 1961 Peter Eckhorn went to Liverpool to sign groups to the Top Ten Club offering 450DM (£40) per man per week. Epstein wanted 500DM (£44.50). Eckhorn left without signing the Beatles (Lewisohn. Chronicle p. 56).

•Jan '62 Roy Young and Horst Fascher came to Liverpool. They were working for Manfred Weissleder, who was planning to open the Star Club. He offered 500Dm per man and a one-off payment of 1000DM under the table. The contract was from April 13 to May 31 '62 (Lewisohn. Chronicle p. 56).

•Peter Eckhorn was anxious to hire the Beatles, but there was the problem of them not having work permits. "Allan Williams came to the rescue once more. He wrote to the German consulate praising the boy's background, musical ability, and personalities, explaining that they had been exploited, as he had been, by the very unprofessional Bruno Koschmider. He asked for work permits for work that was very much above board, with a very honorable German businessman, Peter Eckhorn. The letter did the trick" (Lennon, Cynthia. Twist p. 53).

•Paul in a letter home from Germany '60: We can buy cornflakes, beefsteak, liver, mashed potatoes, onions, etc. at the local cafe' now. He went on to rhapsodize about buying cold glasses of milk for only thirteen pfennigs ("cheap enough") and closed by saying "I'd rather be home" (Flippo, p. 107).


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